Made In Japan / China / America

One very obvious cultural different after moving from America to Japan – was noticing where products and goods are manufactured.

In America we’ve gotten used to the fact that nearly everything is made in China. We think of China as the worlds shopping mall for all things cheap, and ultimately disposable. In fact it’s quite a challenge to buy “Made In America” products most of the time. We’ve had this justified to us by politicians that countries that “make things” are generally filthy – and also stuck with the pollution of industrialization, and that this low-class type of economy is part of the past. There is an element of truth to this, certainly.

So, you can imagine my shock, after moving to Japan to find so many things “Made In Japan”. This coming from a country that sits right next to China – not across the globe. Don’t get me wrong, there is still plenty of products here made in China. But during a normal shopping experience in America (for example, a hardware store) you can bet, without a doubt that any cheap plastic goods come from China.

On the contrary, in Japan! Yes, these goods are often slightly more expensive (not everything is), and the quality is generally superior, and of course it is “Made in Japan”. It’s quite an interesting trade off if you ask me, and raises some questions about how a country supports it’s own economy.

I must admit, I’m no economist. So I have mostly questions without answers;

  • Does the nature of capitalism fuel this continual hunger to reach the cheapest possible cost for any item?
  • What is the actual trade off for saving $1 on an item, and is it really worth it? How much benefit to one’s own economy can paying $1 more provide?
  • Would Americans, in a neutral, politics-free environment, prefer the more durable product at higher cost? Or is always buying cheapest the new American ideal?

 

This doesn’t mean that I think that the USA should turn back the clock and start making all of it’s own products.
But, there is a price to pay for cheap goods. Whether it’s child labor, air pollution, or import dependencies on other countries – there is always a cost for the consumer to save that buck. The bigger question is will they consider these costs? Quite simply – No. The average consumer is simply choosing from what’s available, and trying to serve their family. I believe thy have simply been brainwashed to believe that this is the only way – that there is no alternative.

I wish for a moment they could walk into a local Japanese store (which would have shut down in the US due to Amazon), to see the local support and superior products for what amounts to mostly pennies more per product. I think If they could experience it, they would feel a bit conned. I don’t believe American’s in their hearts want to be the “throw away” culture. But we’ve let ourselves become compliant, and lazy, when placed in the environment of making everything cheap and easy. It’s easy to buy “Made in Japan” when living in Japan, and I like that.

What do you think about the trade-off between “cheap” versus quality & self-reliance? Let me know in the comments below.

8 Things That Are Cheaper in Japan

Sushi – Fish (and Really Anything From the Ocean)

This one comes as no surprise. While sushi can be a specialty item in the US, often reserved for an expensive night out, it’s availability has exploded over the years in Japan. For those on a limited budget, $1 sushi restaurants are widely available – while those with a discerning palate can find the best there is to offer.

Haircuts

I have friends that have made quite a name for themselves in the US hair salon industry. I think that haircuts here in Japan are generally seen as a bit more utilitarian. Also taking into account that Japan is a non-tipping society, you can expect a reduced cost from this alone. But what about quality you ask? I’ve had great luck with my notoriously difficult hair, and stylists generally tell me that my soft foreigner hair is actually easier for them.

Dental Health

Healthcare

Japan has a national healthcare system with prices that are set by the government and guarantee relatively equal access. I won’t debate the politics of what may, or may not work in the US – but I can tell you my personal experience. I have received excellent and affordably healthcare in Japan, and never have to worry about whether or not I can afford it. Nobody goes bankrupt in Japan due to medical expenses.

Take for example Jameson seen here for 1695¥, or roughly $15.50, not bad at all!

Many UK and American Whiskies

When shopping here in the Japanese countryside I expected American whisky (like most American items) to be more expensive, as well as my favorite Irish and Scotch whiskeys. I was pleasantly surprised to find that it’s actually cheaper than  in the US. I’m not sure of the reason, but if I had to speculate I would say that these brands just aren’t as known here. With the rise of Japanese whisky fame, local brands are a more popular part of the social consciousness. There may be import tax reasons as well, of course – but whatever cause, no complaints here!

Chicken Breast / White Meat

Coming from supposedly health-conscious California, where chicken breast is prized for its lean dietary benefits I was surprised to find how inexpensive it is in Japan. I guess it makes sense as it is a rather bland cut of meat. Last sale price I saw was 38¥ per 100grams, or roughly $1.60 a pound versus the US which can range $3-6/lb.

Child Care

I good but relatively average-cost preschool in Los Angeles cost me ~$900/mo, before that my kid was in an expensive daycare where they played, but no education. Preschool in Japan is government subsidized for working parents. In the US I had to prepare his lunch daily, while in Japan they receive healthy school lunches. The cost to me is minimal ~$200/mo. Not only that, but I would make the argument that early education in Japan is far superior to the US, safe, healthy and the teacher-to-student ratio is excellent.

All You Can DrinkAll-You-Can-Drink

I’m not sure if this one counts, as I rarely ever even see “all you can drink” in the US unless your’e talking about someone who contracted an “open bar”. It’s probably due to fears about liability or disorderly drunks. But in Japan, it’s rather common to see this featured at various restaurants with a set price and time limit (usually a couple hours).

Spa’s, Wellness Centers, and Public Baths

OnsenJapan is home to 10’s of thousands of hot springs, with a rich cultural tradition of cleanliness and wellness as achieved though mind and body purification. Public baths and onsen are found everywhere and often feature western recognized features such as sauna, massage (extra cost), and more. As one of the most popular activities, there are many destinations keeping the price affordable for all.

Did I miss one? Tell me about your experience in the comments below!

5 Japanese Habits Your Family Can Start Today! (Featured Guest Blog)

Just because you haven’t visited or moved to Japan yet doesn’t mean you can’t start incorporating some of the healthy habits observed by many in Japan!

Today we bring you a new article;

5 Japanese Habits Your Family Can Start Today!

…prominently featured over at the Grey, Grizzled and Gaijin blog as part of their “Lifting People Up in 2018” Feature.

grey_grizzled

We’d like to thank Craig at GGG for working diligently to helping those of us working to bring you the hidden gems of Japanese culture, adventure and lifestyle. Learn more about the Grey, Grizzled and Gaijin blog here.

Showa Era Museum

Takayama Showa Era Museum 昭和時代

Today I bring to you a true Hidden Gem of Takayama-city – the Shōwa era museum. Hidden Gem in every send of the word. Hidden because it’s literally through the back of a toy & candy store, unseen until you enter through a curtained door. A Gem because while it is not huge in size, it’s uniqueness and quality make up for it in its brilliance!

The Takayama Showa-kan is located right in the middle of Takayama near the old town on a fairly nondescript side street, aside from some retro signs and animatronic sculptures that set it apart from the surroundings.

The windows give you a peek into the toy and candy store.
The windows give you a peek into the toy and candy store.

Once inside the toy and candy store… you wonder, how big could this museum be?? There’s really no way to tell without paying admission. My opinion – it’s worth the $8 to get in, and there was more to explore than I expected. Certainly not a huge museum – but an adventure for the eyes with plenty entertain you for an hour or two.

As you enter the museum you begin to feel transported to a part of Japan’s not too distant past (Showa period 1926-1989). A time that endured a lot of change and most of us have only seen in the movies, where industry, fashion and culture changed following the war. For some, that period may even be our original vision of Japan.

The layout of the museum breaks the art installations out into various themed rooms or shops that line a street.

You get the quaint feeling that this must have started as someone’s personal collection… which grew out of control, and then took on a new meaning – and then others began to contribute. Is this true? Maybe not – but i’d like to believe it is.

Some of the items are rare pop-culture relics that collectors-of-too-many-things like me would love to have in their own home, while other items feel more normal, as if you might be able to find them in a second-hand junk store. Together it works, building a vibe that allows the imagination to run.

It’s not hard to find a variety of classic movie posters, both foreign and domestic.

Another thing that makes this museum unique is the access. There’s no barriers, ropes or security guards – you are in it. Trusted to treat the place with a measure of respect.

Shōwa era restaurant
Recreation of a Shōwa era restaurant.
Buddy Mike steps into the past.
Buddy Mike steps into the past.

As i wander around, I wonder where all this stuff came from, and who in town still has treasures like these sitting in their own closet or storage house. I certainly don’t see these types of items in the local second-hand store. One side of the street we see a barber shop, while another corner has a recreation of a camera stores. You pop in and out of rooms, and inevitably your eyes are drawn to the tiny details

Video game nerds will be happy to know there is a small gaming area set aside with emulations of Nintendo, Intellivision, and other 80’s era game consoles where you can take a rest and relive some childhood memories.

The Classroom
The Classroom

And I can’t go without mentioning one room which i found to be especially endearing – the Showa era classroom. Is this classroom like the one that “the creator” of this museum went to school in? I can’t tell you. But I hope to answer some of these lingering questions about how and why this small but beautiful museum was created, and I hope that you check back if you are just as curious as I am.

Now go check out my post 8 Things to Love About the Japanese Countryside.

Wintertime Entertainment

Depending on where you live in Japan, the seasons can be a bit extreme. Summer often brings heat and humidity and winter brings the beautiful snowfall. One thing you can count on is that there will be plenty to entertain you. Where I’m located, near Takayama City in Gifu prefecture (often referred to as the Japanese Alps), snow is basically guaranteed.

View From My House of The Snowy Landscape

So what can you do?

It seems like every neighborhood has it’s own community center, open to the public with activities and exercise equipment, as well as indoor sports like rock-climbing which help keep the kids busy and active during the winter. For us parents – we get the additional exercise of shoveling snow from our driveways and cleaning off our cars every morning along side our neighbors.

Sledding, snowmen, snowballs, igloos, and more.

But another thing small Japanese towns can brag about is the sense of community created through everyday interactions, and local events and activities – such as a day for kids to come together and play in the snow at the local park.

This event was hosted by a local group associated with the city, including teachers to games and a good time for the kids like tug-of-war and other team building activities. 

In addition to sledding and games, here was entertainment by local performers, with snacks and goodies provided for the kids to take home.

Of course I can’t go without mentioning the HOT miso soup cooked up in a nearby tent and provided to every chilly visitor. 

Ohinasama Hina Ningyo

Hina Ningyo Dolls 雛人形 Ohinasama お雛様

A holiday and festival called Hinamatsuri (雛祭り, or Girl’s Day/Doll’s Festival, is celebrated on March 3rd.  Before the holiday takes place families set out a display of ornamental dolls (雛人形 hina-ningyō) representing the Emperor, Empress, attendants, and musicians (of the Heian period).

While I’ve seen these dolls in various settings, I’d never really learned the meaning behind it. As my Japan family recently set theirs up, it seemed like a good opportunity to document the occasion!

From sometime in February to March 3, the dolls are displayed, resting atop a platform of seven tiers. First the platform is assembled, and then covered by red fabric/carpet with rainbow striped at the bottom (dankake (段掛) or  hi-mōsen (緋毛氈). Platforms for the dolls are placed reflecting a very specific order, which varies somewhat depending on region ( Kantō and Kansai).

Various miniature tools, and furniture are added such as chests, a mirrors, and other items you’d find in the palace.

Instructions
I found these old setup directions which weren’t much help, a bit dated judging by the hairstyle.

Once the dolls have been placed, they each receive their rightful accessories including instruments for the musicians, swords and bow/arrows for the ministers, crowns, fans, and more.

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Here you can see the before & after of the old minister (daijin)  getting his hat, weapons, and accessories.

When complete, you end up with a rather impressive display. Some doll sets are purchased new, while many others are handed down over generations. The dolls are put away promptly following the March 3rd holiday, as a superstition surrounds those being left out for too long!

My family also had a small side table displaying some older style ceramic dolls.

That’s all for now, check back for a post on the Hinamatsuri itself, which like other Japanese festivals is about to include traditional food and drink to accompany the day.

雛人形 [ひなにんぎょう (hinaningyou)]
お雛様, 御雛様 [おひなさま (ohinasama)]

Is (BLANK) better in Japan or in the US?

I’ve got a small list of items here. Some I miss terribly from the US, while others are SO much better here in Japan. Am I qualified to say which is “better” after only 1 year in Japan? Absolutely not! But based on my completely biased opinion – I’m going to pass some generalized judgement judgement!

Some of these are obvious, while a few  might surprise you! Disagree with me? Have one to add? Let me know in the comments below.

Hamburgers:

This is a tough one for me, as I live in the city with perhaps the best hamburger in Japan. But this list is a general one – not about exceptions, or specialties. I’ve got to admit it – I miss a fresh, inexpensive In & Out burger from time to time. There are great burgers in Japan – but i’ve got to give the nod to the good ol’ USA on this one. But Japan reigns supreme on what they call a Hambagu ( ハンバーグ ) or hamburger-steak which they’ve made into something special of their own.

Various Sweet Peppers

Fresh Vegetables:

Does it matter? Hell yes! In Japan all the vegetables are sourced from local farms – even better, I’m surrounded by farms with their own stands. Sometime’s it’s a bit more expensive than the US depending on what is in season/time of year, but a wise shopper learns the ropes rather quickly. Still a fraction of what those overpriced healthy supermarkets in the US cost.

Bread:

This is a tough one guys – very close. I’m an American, so you know I’m basically required to love me some bread. And being a sandwich lover, the varieties of wheat, rye, sourdough that you find in the US is something I’d gotten used to. But I said this was going to be a generalized judgement. In which case, the Japanese soft white fluffy bread is delightful. And there are tiny amazing bakeries everywhere. Europe is probably the world leader, but in this contest – the slight edge here goes to Japan! They even cut the crusts off sandwiches. Shut up and take my money!

Ethnic Food:

I might be opening up a can of worms here. I really love the Japanese take on Italian and Chinese food (neither of which bear much resemblance to the US variation). But when I’m talking about the availability and enjoyability of Thai, Indian, Mexican, and other ethnic food options – you just can’t beat the biggest melting-pot-of-a-country, the US of A.

Early Childcare / PreSchool:

I know what your saying, that’s not food. I didn’t say this was all about food did I? In Los Angeles I paid between $600-1000 per month for day care and then preschool. In Japan it’s mostly subsidized coming in at around a couple hundred dollars a month, and honestly – amazing. Very high ratio of teachers to students, very interactive and social environment. I have to give a round of applause to Japan here. A major influence on my move.

Freeways

This one is a bit tricky, as the freeways in Japan are most definitely not free (I guess we all pay somehow, in any country). But the freeways are maintained, clean, and pretty much always have plenty of workers to make repairs where needed. But the cost of driving even just a couple hours away can really add up with tolls! It’s a bit of a toss up here – but if we’re including the word “free” then I believe the edge must go to the USA here (horrible LA freeways exempt from this win).

Playgrounds

You know, like the ones at the park that your kids go crazy on. I was surprised to see so many of them here in Japan, built from wood and steel and concrete like it was done in the US – say 30+ years ago. The US is safety focused, lots of plastic and soft landing pads. So far the US has the advantage here – safety is important. But where Japan takes the cake is by letting kids be kids, and not worrying as much about lawsuits – frees them up to make some rather wild playgrounds by comparison. I often find myself playing alongside my kids, reliving some youth.

Takayama BeerBeer

This is a tough one, i’ve only been here a year, and I’m tasting them as fast as a can folks! Japan has a budding microbrewery industry, and theres a site with some great info here. But just the sheer size of the US, and the advantage of being focused on it longer with more affordable brews – gives the US an edge. I may change my mind with time. So check back!

Beef

I’d like to reserve the right to remain silent… but I won’t. This one is too tough. Growing up with Santa Maria style tri-tip as part of my diet, with beef as my national staple – and then moving to Japan and enjoying Hida Beef : possibly the best beef in the world. US beef is more affordable, and you can get a nice steak any day of the week at a reasonable price. Hida beef IS the standard here, although costly, but something that every human should experience. This one is too tough folks. I love them both. Japanese Wagyu is superior, but is it an exception? or just a very high standard? What’s your opinion? Comment below.

Challenges On Your Visit to Japan (And Navigating Them)

Before moving to japan, I had a handful of visits. And while navigating Japan for me was overwhelmingly magical, there was always a few tiny things which made for minor inconveniences which could have been easily avoided – if I knew in advance. So hopefully this Blog post comes in handy for someone with an upcoming trip to Japan, so that they have zero detractions.

Problem 1: Always taking shoe’s on & off
Yes, you do it whenever you enter someone’s home. But that’s not all. Many businesses, and restaurants with tatami mats will also require it (possibly offering you slippers). It can be a new task to deal with, so think about it in advance.
Solution: Slip on/off shoes. Maybe bring an extra pair of Croc’s for convenience.

Problem 2: No paper towels, only hand dryers
This one bugs me more than many of the others. I hate having wet hands! But for the sake of waste and conservation it makes sense.
Solution: Always bring a handkerchief, or small hand towel with you and keep it somewhere on your person. If you have a baby, those wet-naps will come in handy too. Your’e going to want to leave any setting better than when you found it (clean up your mess).

Problem 3: Having pockets full of change
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Your American dollars are not accepted here! So get used to paying in Yen. Oh by the way, any denomination less than 1000Yen (~$10) is a coin. That’s right men, break out that coin purse.
Solution: Force yourself to pay using as much change as possible in every transaction. And i’m serious, bring a coin purse / wallet with pockets.

Problem 4: No Garbage Cans / Recycling
That’s right, almost everything is either burned or recycled in Japan. I currently separate my garbage into 8, yes EIGHT different categories of trash (burnables, paper, cardboard, plastic, bottles, cans, styrofoam, non-burnables). It’s exhausting! So why is it so rare to see public trash cans, and how does everything stay so damn clean? Because you are responsible for your own trash.
Solution: Keep some plastic bags on hand. Convenience store trashcans are for things you buy there only. So be prepared to bring your trash with you, back to your car/hotel or wherever. Have a baby? Bring ziplock bags for those poopy diapers. Yep, nobody want’s them.

Problem 5: You don’t speak Japanese
In Tokyo many people will speak English, or at least some limited English., but beyond that – all bets are off. You are in another world, so you better come at least slightly prepared. Do yourself a favor and don’t perpetuate a bad stereotype for foreigners. If you try to speak some limited Japanese – odds are people will meet you half-way, or at least understand your intention and respect the effort.
Solution: Congratulations, you live in the age of technology which opens up a lot of possibilities. But you should still memorize all the common phrases you’d need on any foreign visit. Cell phone apps like ImiWa (Dictionary) and GoogleTranslate are FREE and helpful. Want to take the next step? Download some lessons at jpod101.com

Problem 6: Squatty Potties (..er traditional Japanese toilets)
Yes, you will occasionally see the old style Japanese toilets. If you’ve never had to use one… well, imagine yourself camping, and the position you’d assume in the woods. End of lesson. It could be a little confusing the first time you see one. (Which way do I face anyway?)
Solution:  Most establishments have Western style toilets, or at least an option. If you don’t see one initially, check the handicapped/baby changing bathroom, as sometimes that washroom is different. Odds are there is simply an alternate business (again, convenience store) that you can walk to where they will have a Western style toilet.
In the event of emergency: Sometimes waiting or going elsewhere is not an option. It’s not a bad idea to at least be able to use the old style commode! Make sure your wallet and other items are safely secured, face towards the flusher, and assume the position. After you’ve had to do it a couple times, it’s rather easy.

Problem 7: You have food allergies / Don’t like certain foods / Afraid of sushi
Don’t fear trying new things! Some things which are impossible to eat in the US, are quite edible in Japan (due to being prepared/raised differently). Having said that, some people have sensitivities.
Solution: Tokyo is an endless assortment of amazing restaurants of all styles. Even in the countryside you can find McDonalds, Denny’s, CoCo’s. etc. (although menu’s vary). If you have an allergy you should be able to convey that in Japanese perfectly. Especially seafood allergies, as most “stock” sauces/soups are fish based in Japan. Maybe pack some emergency snacks in your suitcase that will satisfy you. And the convenience store is your friend, and almost always has sandwiches and other very simple fresh foods.

Two (special) melons for $50 – serious fruit!

Problem 8: Expensive Food
I’ve seen prices on food that I never thought imaginable. An $30 melon? yep. You name it. But these are specialty cases. And with restaurants, you could pay any price. But you don’t have to pay a lot for a good meal.
Solution: It’s all about familiarity. For $5 i can fill up at a local Udon restaurant. Put down the travel guide, and talk to a local to find where to go. Supermarkets are loaded with freshly made inexpensive food (with sushi half-off after 6:30 – wow!).

Problem 9: You are arriving in the summer – or the winter
Japan is (stereotypically) humid in the summer, and can get quite cold in the winter depending on location. Ideal times to visit are during the spring or the fall.
Solution: Be prepared to sweat in the summer! Japanese are used to it, and have a great number of helpful things such as face / deodorant wipes to keep you feeling fresh and clean. For the winter I’d suggest layering of course, but stop by Uniqulo and get yourself a lightweight down jacket – it’s amazing how warm they keep you.

Learn more about some cultural differences I’ve noticed in my recent blog post – 6 Striking Cultural Personality Diferences

Hopping Trains

6 Striking Cultural Personality Differences

We’re all human, and share a lot in common. But now that I live in Japan, I can witness in person how culture works to mold our  personalities from childhood. If you transplant a person from one culture, and place them into another – unprepared, it could result in a fish-out-of-water experience. This is especially interesting to me as my kids were born in the US but now developing here.

While I see very subtle differences in Japanese and American culture on a daily basis, here are a few that jumped out at me early on:

1. Projection of Strength

In the US I’ve often felt as if to get things done, you must prepare to go to battle. Need a utility bill corrected? Start out nice – but be ready to ramp up the intensity. Need to convince a boss of something? Things might get a little heated. The appearance of strength is often interpreted as being passionate about something in the US. Not so much in Japan. Superior effort and service is the norm while maintaining order, balance and harmony in society as well as with your own emotions is expected. In short, being determined, persistent yet respectful, and showing great effort are how you will succeed.

2. Eye Contact

How shall I put this – it’s just different. In America eye-contact happens always, and is expected to show respect. In Japan having direct eye contact with a superior could even be seen as disrespectful. While I enjoy quite a bit of leeway here as a foreigner, I do feel a subtle difference. People are happy to engage me and connect – often after I extend a friendly greeting. If someone walks by me they might not make eye contact, possibly thinking I’m a tourist, don’t speak the language or most likely just nervous about an awkward encounter. But once I engage people, I’m often lavished with friendly conversation, attention and yes, eye contact.

3. Driving Habits

I would say that in the US, there is a the bad stereotype of the asian driver. I have found that in Japan that people are generally excellent drivers, who are extremely polite and courteous of other drivers. This probably has something to do with the fact that they must spend $2000-3000 on driving school to become certified experts, and a huge investment of time to receive a license. The upside for them, is that generally traffic cops often tend to just leave people alone, at least in the countryside. Possibly being a great driver depends on everyone following the rules too, rather than the general chaos of the US. Rather than a friendly wave – you’ll see people waiting for each other, and bowing as a respectful thank you.

4. Straightforwardness

This extends into a number of areas, from the language itself to confrontations with others. Approaching something very directly can commonly be seen as rude, and the result is that in the language, you often hear people dancing around a topic, and decisions and issues often taking a surprisingly long time to get worked out. I’ve often thought – can’t we just ask directly? As with most things, there is a Japanese way to approach things, and often every angle must be considered.

5. A Process for Everything

There’s been a few times since moving to Japanese that I’ve thought, “without help, I could not have got this done”. Getting a cell phone, setting up a bank account, applying for a drivers license – things such as this, seem to take a ridiculous amount of time and old fashioned written paperwork. Japan is advanced in many ways, but there is a specific process for everything, usually involving a lot of paperwork. Make a mistake – you will likely be starting over. While I believe the attention to detail results in fewer errors and a clear result, the process itself can often feel far less efficient or overly complex. Cutting through the red-tape seems like a uniquely American ideal.

6. Looking Out for #1

There is a certain level of independence that Americans have, which wasn’t exactly clear to me until I moved to Japan. Not the kind of independence you might imagine (like, Yay – America – Freedom, Independence). I mean acting independently, the actions we take serving ourselves, but sometimes being only self-serving. The great positive side of this is our willingness to take risk and act alone, and make a big or even risky decision! Americans roll the dice once in a while, and I love this about our culture. Japanese tend to look towards the collective success and happiness of the group, whether it’s their company, their family or even group of friends. This cultural difference holds plenty of room for misunderstanding, simply because our approach to things can be so different.
That’s it for now. I know there are an endless supply of differences which make living in a different culture fun, interesting, at times frustrating – but mostly thought provoking and exciting.

Have you experienced an obvious cultural difference? Please comment and share!
Check out my post on Navigating Challenges on Your Trip to Japan

Sanno Matsuri まつり 祭り

As the seasons change one exciting form of public entertainment is the many festivals, often regional or for specific purposes, which take place in Japan. When I say Japan I’m really speaking about my own very limited experience, in the Hida Takayama region of Gifu prefecture, and the Takayama Spring and Fall festivals.

In April you can truly witness the change of seasons, with drastic changes happening overnight. Literally, I’ve woken up to fields of flowers that were not there the day before.
Takayama’s spring festival, or Sanno Matsuri, celebrates this change of season. Takayama’s festivals are generally regarded as one of the best in japan, due to the sheer beauty of the elaborate displays called Yatai.

Now let me take a step back here. It’s hard to know how to describe what the Yatai is, and the closest english is probably “parade float” but I really hate to use those words for two reasons. 1. I’ve never been a fan of parades, and I wouldn’t compare one to the festivals. and 2. When I say “float” it makes me think of an inflatable Donald Duck ballon or something, and the Yatai carts are ornate wheeled displays with intricate carvings, lacquering, woven-work and decorative metal-work, found both on the outside and inside – some with intricate mechanical puppets which perform as part of the entertainment.

 

My understanding is that the different Yatai carts were created by different surrounding communities, with contributions from various artisans from those communities. Over time they would be further improved, and with a bit of competition between the communities the carts would become even more beautiful.

As expected there is music, dancing, performances, and of course my favorite… many differed food stalls to choose from. I recommend attending one for yourself if at all possible.